Category: Wholly Hopkins Summer 2011

Speaking of violence in Rwanda and Baltimore

June 1, 2011 |  by Michael Anft

When Edmond Baganizi, SPH ’11, explored Baltimore by bus, he was moved by the poverty he saw. “Poverty is one of the things that make people more prone to violence here, just like in Rwanda,” he says. Baganizi feels that connection in his bones. As a child in Rwanda, he and a few of his […]

Read more

Preserving research universities’ “vital triad”

June 1, 2011 |  by Niv Elis

In a New York Review of Books essay covering a flurry of books critical of U.S. higher education, scholar Peter Brooks summarized the charges: “Above all, the university has become unjustifiably expensive, inaccessible, and unaccountable.” What are federal and state governments getting for their money? What are students (and parents) getting for their money? Can […]

Read more

Recordings: Guitar, voice, flute + more guitar

June 1, 2011 |  by Dale Keiger

Manuel Barrueco became entranced by the guitar when he was an 8-year-old in Santiago de Cuba. Part of what entranced him was the music of Francisco Tárrega. Tárrega was a 19th-century Spanish composer and guitarist who did much to bring classical guitar to the recital stage. By the time he was 11, Barrueco was performing […]

Read more

Tales unadorned and told from the bottom up

June 1, 2011 |  by Michael Anft

It’s a dreary day in one of Baltimore’s trendier neighborhoods. A young man with a gaunt face and big glasses sits at an unsteady table in a mid-scale hipster hash house. He picks at his late lunch of steak and Brussels sprouts and spies on a middle-aged couple seated on a public bench out front. […]

Read more

Edward Miller to retire

June 1, 2011 |  by Dale Keiger

In 1997, Johns Hopkins made the title on Edward Miller’s business card really long when it named him dean of the School of Medicine, university vice president for medicine, and the first-ever chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Next summer, Miller will simplify his designation. He has announced he will retire from Hopkins on […]

Read more

Vignette

June 1, 2011 |  by Dale Keiger

Navin K. Singh, assistant professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the School of Medicine, estimates he has operated on more than 500 children as part of volunteer medical missions to correct cleft palates, lips, and noses. Hoping to bolster the kids’—and their parents’—spirits and make them feel less different and alone, he and Johns […]

Read more

Cordish Center

June 1, 2011 |  by Johns Hopkins Staff

If you are a fan of Johns Hopkins lacrosse, you’ve probably grown used to buying pretzels, Italian sausage sandwiches, and sodas in the southeast end of Homewood Field. Well, prepare for a change. This summer, construction begins on the new 14,000-square-foot Cordish Lacrosse Center, which will house both men’s and women’s lacrosse programs and include […]

Read more

Now we know…

June 1, 2011 |  by Dale Keiger

…Johns Hopkins researchers may have found an alternative to liver transplants. A team led by Yoon-Young Jang, assistant professor of oncology at the Kimmel Cancer Center, demonstrated that adult stem cells that had been genetically reprogrammed to revert to an embryonic state succeed in regenerating liver tissue in mice. The research appeared in the May […]

Read more

Solving the mystery of Death Valley’s walking rocks

June 1, 2011 |  by Michael Anft

How does a hundred-pound rock walk itself 100 yards across a cracked, dry desert surface? Johns Hopkins researchers investigate.

Read more

The poetic subversion of capitalism

June 1, 2011 |  by Darcy Courteau

Associate professor Christopher Nealon explores the subversive side of contemporary American poetry.

Read more